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An experimental drug may be very useful for bone growth in children with dwarfism

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An experimental drug, called vosoritide, could be very useful for bone growth in children with dwarfism. In fact, this drug interferes with some proteins that cause bone growth to stop.

During the first experiments with this drug, the researchers saw that the average annual physical growth rate of 35 children and adolescents suffering from achondroplasia, one of the forms of dwarfism, increased by about 6 cm per year. It is a growth in height close to the average of children without dwarfism and with an average height.

The study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, was also written by Julie Hoover-Fong, director of the Greenberg Center for Skeletal Dysplasias at the Johns Hopkins Institute McKusick-Nathans of Genetic Medicine, United States.

According to Hoover-Fong, this drug could be useful for people characterized by low growth or suffering from dwarfism and alleviate all the suffering caused by sleep apnea, problems with the neurological apparatus of the legs or back and those pathologies caused in particular from impaired or insufficient bone growth.

For long-term effects, in any case, longer trials will be needed.

Achondroplasia is a rare form of dwarfism that affects about one child in 15,000 to 40,000 live births and is caused by the mutation of the FGFR3 gene. Those affected by achondroplasia very often are also subject to other pathologies such as sleep apnea, chronic ear infections, neurological problems, spinal stenosis and curved legs.

Sean Cox

I am a Physics professor at Florida A&M University and an amateur astronomer with a keen interest in not just my own areas of specialization, but also biology, robotics and computer science (I am also an amateur C++ programmer and Python developer). While my current responsibilities do not allow me to spend a whole lot of time writing about science research, I thoroughly enjoy doing so when I get the chance, and started Bitobit News to engage in that hobby and also to try to get at least a few other people interested in the wonderful world of science.

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